Men’s Ministry School Supplies Drive

August 1, 2018 by  
Filed under ANNOUNCEMENTS

THe FBC Men’s Ministry will take donations of school supplies for the upcoming school year. They will be receiving donations of pencils, paper and notebooks,etc.

Male Chorus Anniversary

July 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

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National Women’s Day August 9, 2018

July 25, 2018 by  
Filed under ANNOUNCEMENTS

National Women’s Day is a South African public holiday celebrated annually on 9 August. The day commemorates the 1956 march of approximately 20 000 women to the Union Buildings in Pretoria to petition against the country’s pass laws that required South Africans defined as “black” under The Population Registration Act to carry an internal passport, known as a pass, that served to maintain population segregation, control urbanization, and manage migrant labor during the apartheid era.[1] The first National Women’s Day was celebrated on 9 August 1994.[2] In 2006, a reenactment of the march was staged for its 50th anniversary, with many of the 1956 march veterans.

Happy Friendship Day August 5, 2018

July 25, 2018 by  
Filed under ANNOUNCEMENTS

Friendship Day is a day specifically dedicated to celebrate the bond called ‘Friendship’. Friendship – one of the sweetest bond, formed due to the mutual relationship of trust, affection, cooperation, and support between two or more person. This year the Friendship Day 2018 Date is 5th of August.

Sometimes the Most Spiritual Thing You Can Do Is Take a Nap

July 25, 2018 by  
Filed under In The News

By Alex McFarland | Tue 24 Jul 2018 6:47 EDT

Have you ever considered your theology regarding R&R? It may be something we think about often, but Christians should make time to get rest for the body and the soul. Acts 3:19 speaks of “times of refreshing” that accompany (and follow) salvation in Christ. This refers primarily to the state of being in right relationship with God, and that ultimately believers will spend eternity in heaven with Him. But the Greek word most often translated as “refreshing” in English Bibles is a word for “breathing easily” or being “revived with fresh air.”

If you know Christ, reflect for a moment on what a blessed state you enjoy as a born-again person right this moment! Allow your standing in Jesus to lift your heart and fill you with rejoicing! Think of it—you are cleared of guilt before the Father; indwelt, filled, empowered by and sealed with the Holy Spirit of God, and secure in the hand of Jesus Himself (John 10:28). We weren’t saved by works and we aren’t kept by works. But by Jesus’ inexplicable and immeasurable grace toward us, we are now friends of God (c.f., Romans 8:1; Ephesians 2:8; John 15:15).

Hebrews 4:10 speaks of Christians having entered into “God’s rest.” In our world today, it is very hard for Christians to slow down, unplug, calm one’s mind and . . . rest. In reality, resting is a privilege and is, in fact, a discipline much needed in every Christian’s life.

Some might object to a call for rest, reasoning that because the world at this moment is so dark and sinful, Christians should work all that much harder to spread the Gospel. The great minister Vance Havner (very influential in the life of Evangelist Billy Graham) once preached on the stewardship responsibility of getting proper rest. Dr. Havner said that it was right for Christians to plan for times of rest and vacation, and that not to do so was unwise. A lady came up and piously objected, “Well, you know the devil never sleeps! The devil never takes a vacation!” Dr. Havner responded, “Since when am I supposed to be like the devil?”

The great thinker Aquinas spoke on the appropriateness of rest, even giving his inimitable Thomistic “thumbs up” to “sports” and “entertainments.” Of course, in the Middle Ages, St. Thomas wasn’t speaking of the NFL or ESPN. But even then, there was the question of whether or not it was OK for Christians to play games or do things just for pure fun.

Aquinas noted that our main purpose in life was to think on God, experience His presence and to worship our Triune Lord. Aquinas said that because rest and “fun” activities can leave us refreshed and prepared to resume thinking on God all the more effectively, then such things were appropriate.

Aquinas, John Wesley and other Christian leaders (Pat Robertson, for example, in the modern era) have recognized that getting proper rest is both a stewardship issue and a spiritual discipline. Aquinas believed that excesses (think materialism, gluttony, drunkenness, workaholism) were issues of temperance. He said that sins against temperance are among the most disgraceful “because they make us most like the irrational beasts.”

So, let’s re-humanize ourselves by heeding God’s call to rest. For you, that may mean taking a fast from technology (try it—power down your cellphone for 24 hours!). Take a break from bingeing on video games or watching hours of cat videos on YouTube. Be honest about your propensity to busy-ness, or even to work-a-holism. Slow down, meditate on Jesus, quietly read Scripture, listen for the still small voice and ask God for rest.

As a wise, elderly preacher from Kentucky once said to me, “Sometimes the most spiritual thing you can do is take a nap.”

Alex McFarland is a speaker, writer and advocate for Christian apologetics. He serves as director of the Center for Christian Worldview and Apologetics at North Greenville University, a leading Christian college in the United States. He has spoken in hundreds of locations throughout North America and internationally and has preached in more than 1,300 churches.
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Donnell Eubanks Singing The National Anthem

July 11, 2018 by  
Filed under ANNOUNCEMENTS

Friendship Baptist Church Youth Donnell Eubanks Sings The National Anthem at the Greenjacket’s Game, June 23, 2018

Keep Heaven on Your Mind

July 10, 2018 by  
Filed under In The News

By Jentezen Franklin | Thu 5 Jul 2018 7:55 EDT

Life can be difficult. At any given time, there are precious people who are strained and stretched to their limit emotionally. There are people struggling with physical pain or pressured by financial difficulties. There are people challenged by disharmony and chaos in their families and their marriages. It’s part of life on earth.

Satan tries to keep us focused on our problems so we forget about our promises. He wants us to live shallow, earth-bound lives. Our enemy wants us to focus on the temporary and lose sight of the eternal, because we become dangerous to his plans when we have eternity in our sight.

He doesn’t want us to remember we are headed for heaven.

The Apostle John wrote these words while marooned on the Isle of Patmos: “After these things I looked, and behold, a door standing open in heaven. And the first voice which I heard was like a trumpet speaking with me, saying, “Come up here, and I will show you things which must take place after this. Immediately I was in the Spirit; and behold, a throne set in heaven, and One sat on the throne…” (Revelation 4:1-2)

Alone on the island, God allowed John to see a door. From behind the door, he heard a voice saying, “Come up here.” Come see what heaven’s like. Are you having a bad day, John? Maybe a bad month? Come up here and look at things from heaven’s perspective.

Suddenly, John found himself in heaven. He could peer into paradise. He began to experience the sounds, the sights, the beauty of heaven.

Heaven is a real place. Jesus Himself said in John 14 that heaven was a real place being prepared for all of us to live in. He even said if it wasn’t true, He would tell us.

Believe it—heaven is real.

We’re going to stand on those streets of gold one day. We’re going to hug everyone we love who arrived there before us. We’re going to dance in the presence of Jesus.

It’s real. It’s waiting for us. This world isn’t our final destination. It isn’t our true home. Our home is with our Father in heaven.

If you’ve lost a loved one and you’re suffering through the pain and the grief, think about heaven. Get heaven and eternity on your mind. One glorious day the grave is going to burst wide open and death is going to be swallowed up in victory.

Do you know why we have a generation who doesn’t think purity and holiness matters? It’s because they don’t really believe Jesus is coming back to take us to heaven.

We’re told in 1 John 3:2-3, “Beloved, now we are children of God; and it has not yet been revealed what we shall be, but we know that when He is revealed, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is. And everyone who has this hope in Him purifies himself, just as He is pure.”

When you hear someone say heaven isn’t real, you’re hearing a slanderous lie spread by the father of lies. Satan knows firsthand the majesty and splendor of heaven. Satan doesn’t want anyone to enjoy heaven. He got kicked out of that wonderful place. He’s bitter toward God, bitter toward God’s people, and bitter about heaven.

Don’t believe his lie. Be assured and comforted—heaven is real.

Imagine yourself there.

Imagine seeing your friends who love Jesus. They’re running to you in this beautiful place. You’re hugging each other and walking together in awe. You have a powerful new body! There’s no sickness, no sadness, no death. You’re talking and laughing.

Then you see someone approaching. It’s Jesus Himself walking toward you with a smile on His face. You fall down to your knees, but He pulls you up and holds you close. He whispers to you, “Welcome home.”

The old things of the earth are gone. Everything is new. You feel God’s love and His peace permeating this place. You are completely and totally at home, and deeply satisfied. It’s the place you always looked for on earth but never really found. And you know that this marvelous place made every trial, every heartache, every pain you experienced on earth totally worth it.

Take comfort in how Paul explains it to the Corinthians: “For our present troubles are small and won’t last very long. Yet they produce for us a glory that vastly outweighs them and will last forever! So we don’t look at the troubles we can see now; rather, we fix our gaze on things that cannot be seen. For the things we see now will soon be gone, but the things we cannot see will last forever.” (2 Corinthians 4:17-18)

I’m not telling you a fairy tale. This is what the Bible clearly teaches. We need to stand on it. If you’re having a bad day, come up here. You’re invited. Keep heaven on your mind..

If you’re going through something bleak on earth, come up here and you’ll see a whole new perspective.

Whether things are going well or falling apart, come up here.

One day you’ll truly be home forever—because heaven is real.

3 Ways Churches Think They Are Known in Their Community

July 10, 2018 by  
Filed under In The News

By Thom S. Rainer | Sun 8 Jul 2018 9:10 EDT

Usually when I ask a question on social media, I expect a decent number of responses. Church leaders and members are typically gracious to me and share their opinions readily.

But when I asked a question about the reputation of their churches in the community, I was inundated with responses. Many wanted to share the good and the bad. Perhaps the most intriguing facet of the study was the three distinct groups in which the responses fell.

The question was simple: “What is your church known for in its community?”

Within a few minutes of my post, many responses came forth. After I read and added all of them, I saw three patterns emerge.

1. About one-half of the churches are known for ministries that require the community to come to the church itself. Great preaching. Incredible worship services. A friendly church. Great events at the church. How our members care for one another. You get the picture. These are all great responses, but they require the community to come to the church. If community members do not set foot on the church’s campus, they will never know about the ministries of the church. For the majority of the churches, the idea of community ministry is “you come to us.”

2. About one-fourth of the churches cited great ministries in and to the community. Partnering with schools in the community. Serving the community with food and clothes. Medical and dental ministries. Ministries to families, parents, and children in the community. The list goes on and on. It was exciting to read how many churches demonstrate their love for their community by actually going into the community.

3. About one-fourth of the churches said they were known for negative reasons. Preacher-eater churches. Congregational fights and splits. Legalism. Unfriendliness. One church leader said his church was known for two murders that occurred a few years apart on the church site. Ouch.

The social media poll did encourage me in many ways. Many of our churches are doing an incredible job connecting with and ministering to the communities in which they are located. And though I am certainly glad to see many church members excited about what is taking place on their church campuses, I fear many members think that community ministry means, “Y’all come to us, and we will minister to you.”

Of course, I am concerned, but not necessarily surprised, about the negative perceptions of some churches in the community. I pray those churches will begin to make a positive impact in the locations where they serve.

What is your church known for in the community? What are your members actually doing in the community and for the community?

Senior Missionary Outreach For July

July 10, 2018 by  
Filed under MINISTRIES

Life Choices was originally named Aiken Pregnancy Care in 1982. It was a non-profit, christian ministry supported by multiple area churches and dozens of local citizens and businesses. What they do is protect the life of unborn babies, equip young women and men to care for themselves and their babies and promote God’s design for a healthy lifestyle. For more information check out www.pregnancyaiken.com.

FBC Deaconesses

June 24, 2018 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

The chief responsibility of the Deaconesses is to serve the people within the church fellowship. They cooperate with the Pastor and Deacons in promoting the spiritual welfare of the church. Their responsibilities include assisting in serving communion and visiting the sick and shut-in members.

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